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Existential Economics: The Fallacy of Demand-Side Economics

We too often accept that the measure of our own successes must naturally hinge upon the extent to which we are able to include or contribute to the lives of others, but this is, of course, untrue. We can take hold of our own personal lives to enhance them by our own original outlooks, creations, and mechanisms by which life is to be principally and existentially measured and supported, and through which our living, breathing moments may be enriched by the commensurate degree to which we are able to satisfy those personally defined measures. We may in fact face reality with nothing more than our own perspectives and the product of our own labor. This is all too possible. 

Indeed, as Adam Smith wrote, one may largely benefit from his immersion into the divisions of labor, but one is held by no obligation, but of his own choosing, to respond to this inherent material advantage. Moreover, one may operate his own economy which serves nothing but the satisfaction of his own desires. He may build it. And he may contract its fruits out to no one. The modern economist wishes to accept that one’s revenue depends upon the presence of demand. 

Here we may finally discover that this belief is unequivocally untrue. It is only out of convenience that this occurs, as permitted by the economies of scale which enable the mass distribution of production and services to be met most efficiently by those who are then able to specialize in optimal unit production in other fields. However, this fails to discredit the input-output model here described in which man may benefit exclusively from his own production, by which his purchasing power — and that of others who may eventually be permitted entry — is positively correlated with the pool of his supply. It is clear here that no level of exogenous consumption — otherwise known as demand — would advance his standard of living. It is only by the direct input of his creative designs and labor that he may benefit, and by which he may consume and thereby enhance his standard of living.     

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