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We’ve Got 99 Problems and Sound Money Ain’t One

One of the great social, political fallacies of the day is found in the unexamined and nearly unconscious belief that all expressed human demands ought to be realized through the market, that money ought to match everywhere with everything that one could possibly desire. 



The popular refrain on this matter follows from the unstated supposition that the market, an abstract and unidentifiable entity representative of innumerable moving parts and human participants, bears certain responsibilities for others who wish to benefit from its activities, even after those individuals have personally failed to contribute anything of their own to that mechanism. 

Unwittingly, those critics assume those other individuals ought to relinquish their freedom of discretion, or some margin of the product of their labor, to satisfy the requests of the specified few who have done little more than to exercise their mouths in communicating their selfish wants. 

The cohorts of people who identify with this camp,…

There's Always Another Tax: The Tragedy of the Public Park

In the San Francisco Bay Area, many residents work tirelessly throughout the year to pay tens of thousands of dollars in annual property taxes.

In addition to this, they are charged an extra 10 percent on all expenses through local sales taxes.

It doesn't stop there.

In addition to their massive federal tax bill, the busy state of California capitalizes on the opportunity to seize another 10 percent through their own sizable state income taxes.

But guess what!

It doesn't stop there.

No, no, no, no. 

In California, there's always another tax.



After all of these taxes, which have all the while been reported to cover every nook and cranny of the utopian vision, the Bay Area resident is left to face yet an additional tax at the grocery store, this time on soda.

The visionaries within government, and those who champion its warmhearted intentions, label this one the "soda tax," which unbelievably includes Gatorade, the preferred beverage of athletes everywhere!

But wait, there&#…

The Failings of Philosophy

A great measure of the disparity between philosophies, especially within the realm of economics and other social sciences, can be attributed to the agreement between the way the world organically operates and the way it might otherwise ideally or hypothetically operate per the proposed model.

In truth, such a contrast is born out of the impassioned philosopher’s demand for a world which is better than the one in which we actually, even regrettably, live.

In this particular case, the perseverant philosopher has journeyed beyond the purview of logic and reason to the realm of fiction and wishful thinking, which proves risky by imbuing the unwitting and impressionable public with pretense hinged to hypotheticals which operate to the tune of tantalizing fantasy rather than to the immutable cadence of reality.



The lazy philosopher, then, works not in search of truth, which proves reliably elusive, but rather to affirm his model and to squeeze data into it despite any apparent disagreement, aw…

Spending More on Education isn’t the Answer

The best and the brightest don't become teachers; they become engineers, innovators, entrepreneurs and leaders of the boardroom. 
The idea that children must learn inside a classroom is an antiquated notion which will fade with time as we introduce more progressive, interactive forms of learning. 
The present education system in the United States is a cautionary tale for those who presume that blindly throwing money at an institution will fix it; instead it only proves to drive up the costs of a failing enterprise. 

This has been the trend since the introduction of the Department of Education in the late 1970s, when the United States began to witness climbing costs and declining academic performance, consistent with the American household relinquishing responsibility to a faceless institutional entity. 
Education begins and continues at the household and personal levels, whereas the classroom, wherever that proves to be in the future, whether on the job or in front of professional men…

America's Illogical Idolization of the Bush Family

Today marks the end of the life of Barbara Bush, who served as First Lady of the United States between 1989 and 1993. 

While 151,600 individuals die each day across the globe, Americans will pause to collectively grieve the loss of this one woman whom they've never met, much less ever had the chance to know at a more-than-academic level. 

And the total of this mourning across the nation will represent a manifestly glorified adoration for a family which symbolizes fantasy and concocted imagination far more than any strict rendering of historical happenings. 



Despite the horrendous implications of the Iran-Contra scandal, the devastating casualties of Iran Air Flight 655, and a set of monetary, fiscal and social policies which unequivocally conflict with the original thousand-points-of-light Bush campaign, a great many Americans remain enamored with the family which appears nearly immune to reproach and primly primed for induction into the immutable annals of whitewashed history.

It is …

Uncle Sam Strips Boston Marathon Champions of Their Winnings

As the elite competitors of the 2018 Boston Marathon endure bone-chilling rain and stifling winds, the U.S. government sits idly by, comfortably prepared indoors and removed from the elements, awaiting their share of the winnings.



It is disturbing to think that the men and women who effectively place their health at risk, who compete under the most dire of circumstances, who press the limits of the human spirit, would finish only to be identified by the federal government as debtors to the state.

That government bears no interest in any other part of the athlete's heart-wrenching odyssey, yet it is there all the while waiting to assume its part in his crowning achievement, not to extend any congratulations, but rather to deliver the bill.

For what?

For being the best. For adding value. For winning.

Incredibly, this government effectively interprets the athlete's achievement as equivalent to the windfall attending the gambler's roll of the dice.

While both of these endeavors alwa…

Into the Wild: What the Statist, the Freethinker and the Capitalist See

There is a rather simple distinction between the freethinker, the capitalist, and the statist. 

When the independent thinker enters the wilderness, he sees the beauty of it, the way the leaves flap in the wind, the formation of the birds. 



He hears the whirring of the wind, the quacking of ducks, whistling of friendly flyers. 

He escapes into the fields, basks in the shimmering sun of independent thought, and gets lost in the exploration of the terrain, the cosmos and the subject of his very existence. 

He is guided inexorably by an unquenchable thirst for knowledge, an undefined set of tantalizing answers to curious questions, and a resolute and nearly desperate fascination with meaning. 

When the capitalist enters the wilderness, he sees opportunity. 

He views the trees, the streams and the wildlife as fountains of harnessable energy, usable materials for shelter, grazable and cultivatable lands for farming, formable trails for hiking and running, and depths of resourceful minerals yet to…

While You Were Blinking: The Curious Crusade of Perspective

Consider for a moment how much of your own life you actually remember. 

Combine that with the total of moments you’ve blinked. 



If that represents the total of what we’ve missed directly in front of us, consider for a moment how much we’re missing behind the scenes or beyond the field of view. 

Beyond this, consider how much of our lives is constructed on beliefs, virtues and even memories recreated for us by other people; even our own memories, which we were ostensibly there to enjoy, endure and only fail to remember. 

And even of those memories which remain with us, only fragments or incomplete snapshots are retrievable. 

As such, we have assumed a great deal when we’ve accepted those narratives at face value as truths or representations thereof, and we have likewise filled the gaps of unknowns with storyline after storyline of the contrived yet familiar sense of normal. 

Such is the case as we pass by the stranger who’s been apprehended by police, he who’s been persecuted by the uniforme…

The Socialist Ideal: A Testimony

The ideal of the socialist is such that when we talk, we say nothing new or offensive, ideally nothing at all, and we keep a strict tally of our syllables and decibels to ensure that there’s sufficient space for the others. 


When we work, we continue only what has already been done, never doing more than we're instructed, and we do it for free without any byproducts or useful product for that matter. 
When we travel, we do it between work and home, with as little spontaneity and style as possible, preferably by bicycle or by foot, or most ideally not at all, so as to avoid offending the planet or encountering another person, who is otherwise known as a victim. 
When we exercise or study, we do it for the benefit of everybody, not for ourselves, and when this serves us an advantage, we offset it by severing a limb, by undergoing a lobotomy, or by pretending to be no different. 
When we compete, we declare everybody a winner, but nobody wins, so we usually avoid competition altogether b…

How Uber and Free Enterprise Resolve Racism

I met a woman today, and it took her less than five minutes to point out that she is black and that people of color have different needs.

She said she studied this subject in college in California, that her courses enlightened her of the various needs which uniquely face the black community and require commensurate community organization to satisfy those ends.

This woman casually charged the entire community, independent of needs, wants and racial composition, with the assumed responsibility of catering to the needs of others whom they don’t even know, and she completed this statement as if the unmentioned history of slavery had miraculously or conveniently escaped her recollection to fail to caution her against such systems rooted inextricably in force and coercion.

First, there are no pure needs in this world, only axiomatic or conditional wants.

In the most fundamental of senses, even those most basic needs are plainly wants demanded for survival.

Indeed, no one truly needs to surv…

What Potholes and Avoidable Car Accidents Suggest About Modern Generations

The Millennial generation can be aptly summarized by the occasional event witnessed along local thoroughfares and across numerous YouTube channels: the motorist who casually drives his or her 7-year-financed car into another vehicle, despite having noticed that other vehicle with more than sufficient time to brake and avoid striking it, only to stubbornly blame the other driver for getting in his or her way. 

The contemporary zeitgeist contends that there is always somebody else to blame. 

Taking personal responsibility appears to be a relic of a time gone by, seldom serving the generation which has grown so widely accustomed to an institutional or systematic solution to every identifiable or imaginable problem. 

In this case, whether it is a driver who has suddenly turned into traffic or another who has driven through a stop sign or passed through a red light, the motorist is always best served by exercising his or her own judgment to avoid danger, instead of thoughtlessly, unquestionin…

A Swing and a Miss: Why the Minimum Wage Law Misses the Mark

It's another swing and a miss for MarketWatch in their latest hit piece labeled Here's why these baseball players may suffer from the $1.3 trillion spending bill



In this modern melodrama of First World proportions, MarketWatch distributes yet another Leftist propaganda piece, lamenting the exemption of minor league baseball players from the federal minimum wage law. 

As it turns out, athletes pursue minor league ball not to get rich, but to prove themselves on the field in hopes of a chance to ascend to the majors and maybe eventually achieve riches. 

In fact, most athletes take a tremendous risk in pursuing their respective sports, working countless hours off the official clock to improve their strength, aptitude and performance. 

Additionally, there are millions of athletes who will never earn a penny through their respective sports, yet they have been motivated by the potential to compete at that level, and they invest their time, money and tireless efforts for that opportuni…

How Sound Ideas Can Translate into Despicable Laws, and Why Socialism Drives Social Dysfunction

Perhaps the most dangerous and costly intellectual endeavor is that nearly involuntary, visceral inclination to equip a thoughtful idea with the power of law. 

There is all the difference in the world between a worthy proposition and one backed by the unquestionable scope and authority of law. 

Remember, laws are neither soft suggestions nor guidelines for human behavior; they are absolute mandates supported by violent force and coercion. 

Proportionality, then, is an important standard to satisfy before rushing to the sweeping supposition that any iron-fisted law might prove successful in rectifying the perceived problem. 

In order to best preserve the freedoms which form the most atomic and precious bases for life, we must consistently investigate the marks and standards which ostensibly justify the invocation of law to carry out given aims, while always erring on the side of freedom. 

That is, of course, if we are to sustain a free world.

Whereas a great number of lazy pundits have sugge…