Skip to main content

Ersatz America: Delusions and Dilutions of the Lives We Live

We increasingly witness a society which is being governed by emotional and political qualms despite their stark contradictions with reality. 

In many senses, we are today dealing in a world of protests against organic phenomena or sheer human preference, as if we encountered a collapsing tree or a runaway train and dared to stand in front of it and pronounce it wrong or incorrect. 

Despite our opinions on those two scenarios, the tree will likely only continue to fall until it reaches the ground, just as the train is likely to proceed right through the impassioned shouts of of caffeinated protestors. 

Standing in front of the train or in the path of the falling tree is just as foolish as condemning the properties of this world and attempting to redefine them to better resemble the world of one’s dreams. 

In this sense, we bear witness to a host of excitable chatterboxes who deal in an ill-defined world wholly separate from reality, where fashionable suppositions and emotional appeals popularly triumph over the unwavering laws of physics and the complex and steadfast phenomena which endure despite popular redefinitions of terms. 

The inspired realist, then, thrusts himself into the unceasing battle against social inertia, which grows only more intense and more insurmountable with every motion picture, every social media post and viral video, and every utterance from the grandstanding demagogue who stands to gain so little (in comparison) by honestly admitting his or her faults and the limits of his or her understanding, a deficit which is commonly ignored, circumvented or offset by enthusiastic delivery, the latter of which serves as a highly-marketable knock-off in the marketplace of ideas, where unwitting and impressionable consumers line up to latch onto easily-digestible epigrams and wondrous one-liners. 

Unfortunately, this brings us no nearer to understanding this world, nor any closer to any semblance of the truth. 

Of course, this is seldom the agenda of those who wish to sell ideas which inherently bear little to no extractable value until a greater fool (or set of fools) has accepted or endorsed them. Even then, the ideas serve only to defraud the unsuspecting intellectual of the wealth he has accumulated through a substantive value-adding enterprise. 

In this case, we witness a form of learning which is more precisely aligned with fantasy or entertainment, an ersatz substitute for the real thing. 

However, this appears to be the way of the Western world today, where possessions and even values and connections have become more superficial and more dispensable than ever, where excuses have become as valuable as (or more valuable than) experience, where feelings rival facts, where instant gratification has triumphed over patience and diligence, where some are born with responsibilities and others with entitlements, and where diversity is measured no deeper than the surface of the skin. 

We are left staring at a banner, relishing its representation of a free world which exists only in text books or in the sleepy minds of hopeless romantics. 



And so a cohort of perfectly-dogmatic idealists propagates a whitewashed history while delusional dreamers tax the public to pave the primrose path toward an ever-elusive utopia everywhere at the expense of the liberties which once made life relatively exceptional (or at least customizable) in the first place.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Into the Wild: An Economics Lesson

The Keynesian mantra, in its implications, has its roots in destruction rather than truth: “In the long run, we’re all dead.” If this is your guiding principle, we are destined to differ on matters of principle and timeline. While it is true that our fates intersect in death, that does not mean that we ought to condemn our heirs to that view: the view that our work on this planet ought only to serve ourselves, and that we ought only to bear in mind the consequences within our own lifetimes.  The Keynesians, of course, prefer their outlook, as it serves their interests; it has the further benefit of appealing to other selfish people who have little interest in the future to which they'll ultimately condemn their heirs. After all, they'll be long gone by then. So, in the Keynesian view, the longterm prospects for the common currency, social stability, and personal liberty are not just irrelevant but inconvenient. In their view, regardless of the consequences, those in charge tod

America's Civil War: Not "Civil" and Not About Slavery

Virtually the entirety of South and Central America, as well as European powers Britain, Spain and France, peacefully abolished slavery — without war — in the first sixty years of the nineteenth century.  Why, then, did the United States enter into a bloody war that cost over half of the nation’s wealth, at least 800,000 lives and many hundreds of thousands more in casualties?  The answer: the War Between the States was not about slavery.  It was a war of invasion to further empower the central government and to reject state sovereignty, nullification of unconstitutional laws, and the states’ rights to secession.  It was a war that would cripple the South and witness the federal debt skyrocket from $65 million in 1860 to $2.7 billion in 1865, whose annual interest alone would prove twice as expensive as the entire federal budget from 1860. It was a war whose total cost, including pensions and the burial of veterans, was an estimated $12 billion. Likewise, it was a war that would

There's Always Another Tax: The Tragedy of the Public Park

In the San Francisco Bay Area, many residents work tirelessly throughout the year to pay tens of thousands of dollars in annual property taxes. In addition to this, they are charged an extra 10 percent on all expenses through local sales taxes. It doesn't stop there. In addition to their massive federal tax bill, the busy state of California capitalizes on the opportunity to seize another 10 percent through their own sizable state income taxes. But guess what! It doesn't stop there. No, no, no, no.  In California, there's always another tax. After all of these taxes, which have all the while been reported to cover every nook and cranny of the utopian vision, the Bay Area resident is left to face yet an additional tax at the grocery store, this time on soda. The visionaries within government, and those who champion its warmhearted intentions, label this one the "soda tax," which unbelievably includes Gatorade, the preferred beverage of athletes