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What Potholes and Avoidable Car Accidents Suggest About Modern Generations

The Millennial generation can be aptly summarized by the occasional event witnessed along local thoroughfares and across numerous YouTube channels: the motorist who casually drives his or her 7-year-financed car into another vehicle, despite having noticed that other vehicle with more than sufficient time to brake and avoid striking it, only to stubbornly blame the other driver for getting in his or her way. 

The contemporary zeitgeist contends that there is always somebody else to blame. 

Taking personal responsibility appears to be a relic of a time gone by, seldom serving the generation which has grown so widely accustomed to an institutional or systematic solution to every identifiable or imaginable problem. 

In this case, whether it is a driver who has suddenly turned into traffic or another who has driven through a stop sign or passed through a red light, the motorist is always best served by exercising his or her own judgment to avoid danger, instead of thoughtlessly, unquestioningly and faithfully depending on the dictates of law. 

Though the other motorist may have been wrong under the eyes of the law, and though you may have palpably delivered the point that you indeed had the right of way, reliance upon that defense can protect neither you nor your family at the time of impact, whereupon any posthumous judgment in your favor can achieve little to nothing by way of repairing the trauma or recovering the lives of those lost.

This leads to motorists driving over potholes instead of driving around them, drivers slamming into others on principle in order to make a point, and residents tolerating potholes and other obstructions instead of repairing them themselves. 



Governments and laws cannot solve your problems, nor can they reconcile each of those which plague this world. 

They can, however, absolve the individual of his personal responsibilities, and they have demonstrably proven to achieve this end across the domains of health, employment, commerce, education, household budgeting, planning for the future, conflict resolution, self-defense, and general self-sufficiency and independence.  

In each of these cases, the best that we can do is to assume responsibility over ourselves and our actions, to defend ourselves, promote our interests and incidentally set the standard for others to follow.

Government cannot solve our problems; they can only collectivize and compound them en route to reducing liberty and repossessing the impetus for individuals to independently identify and navigate them themselves. 

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