Skip to main content

The Vicious Vortex of Palatably Promoting Poverty

The African-American population is disproportionately represented in the American prison system.

The African-American vote is also disproportionately in favor of Democratic candidates.

Democratic candidates are disproportionately in favor of dependency programs and the minimum wage law.

Dependency programs are disproportionately correlated with single-parent households.

Single-parent households are disproportionately associated with African-American families.

Adolescents of single-parent households are disproportionately associated with low household income, both of which are disproportionately connected with violent behaviorlow academic achievement and low self-esteem.

Low academic achievement is disproportionately tied to low income.

The minimum wage law disproportionately affects the African-American teen who's helplessly subjected to unemployment and then remains hopelessly mired in low self-esteem and a burgeoning dependency system which accomplishes nothing in the way of cultivating marketable skills.

Individuals with low academic achievement, low self-esteem, violent behavior and low income are disproportionately represented in the American prison system.

African-American men are disproportionately represented in this system, which leaves their children to perpetually stave off this statistical threat into perpetuity.



So it appears through this sequence of logic that the disproportionate outcomes have been widely driven by a disproportionate proclivity of the African-American demographic for public policy peddled by Democratic, or neo-liberal, candidates and officeholders.

The perpetual struggle of this group may then be attributed to a gross misunderstanding of public policies' effects on the world and, more specifically, their own demographic. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

America's Civil War: Not "Civil" and Not About Slavery

Virtually the entirety of South and Central America, as well as European powers Britain, Spain and France, peacefully abolished slavery — without war — in the first sixty years of the nineteenth century.  Why, then, did the United States enter into a bloody war that cost over half of the nation’s wealth, at least 800,000 lives and many hundreds of thousands more in casualties?  The answer: the War Between the States was not about slavery.  It was a war of invasion to further empower the central government and to reject state sovereignty, nullification of unconstitutional laws, and the states’ rights to secession.  It was a war that would cripple the South and witness the federal debt skyrocket from $65 million in 1860 to $2.7 billion in 1865, whose annual interest alone would prove twice as expensive as the entire federal budget from 1860. Likewise, it was a war that would witness a five-fold increase in the number of civilians employed by the federal government, as federal gove

Into the Wild: An Economics Lesson

There is a great deal of substance behind the Keynesian motif, “In the long run, we’re all dead.” If this is your prerogative, your axiom, we are destined to differ on matters of principle and timeline. Surely, any quantity or decided cash figure is relevant exclusively to the available produce yielded by its trade. The current valuation thereof, whilst unadulterated, corroborates a rather stable, predictable trend of expectations, whereas its significance wanes once reconfigured by a process of economic, fiscal or monetary manipulation.  Individuals, vast in their interests and their time preferences and overall appetites, are to be made homogeneous by an overarching system which predetermines the price floors, ceilings and general priorities of life. Of course, all of this exists merely in abstract form. However, the supposition proposed by those who champion the agenda of “basic needs” fails to complement the progress achieved by the abolition of presumed guilt by the sole mis

Cullen Roche's Not So "Pragmatic Capitalism"

In his riveting new work Pragmatic Capitalism , Cullen Roche, founder of Orcam Financial Group, a San Diego-based financial firm, sets out to correct the mainstream schools of economic thought, focusing on  Keynesians, Monetarists, and Austrians alike. This new macroeconomic perspective claims to reveal What Every Investor Needs to Know About Money and Finance . Indeed, Roche introduces the layman to various elementary principles of economics and financial markets, revealing in early chapters the failed state of the average hedge fund and mutual fund operators -- who are better car salesmen than financial pundits, Roche writes --  who have fallen victim to the group think phenomenon, spawning the nearly perfect positive correlation to the major indexes, and thus, accounting for tax, inflation, and service adjustments, holistically wiping out any value added by their supposed market insight.  Roche also references popular studies, such as the MckInsey Global Institute's report whi