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Household Pressures and Assumed Responsibilities Largely Responsible for the Illusion of Inequity Sold As the Gender Pay Gap

The gender pay gap, on the whole, may after all be the consequence of the specific pressures applied to males in their unique respective roles as the anticipated providers of their respective households, an incentive buttressed by the market for courting women. 

Meanwhile, women are rewarded for distinctly different traits which are not necessarily inclusive of their respective capacities to generate income for the household. The general market outcome -- that is, those discernible averages based on gender -- may spawn from the ubiquity of academically-repugnant, yet pragmatically-desirable preferences mutually expressed, desired, perpetuated and encouraged by men and women in their social conventions.

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  1. I had this put to me in terms, with which I'm sure you can relate, supply and demand terms. Biologically speaking the male, with nearly infinite gametes, and being unencumbered with child birth and (mostly) rearing, is designed to increase his odds of successfully passing on his genetic material by spreading the seed widely, essentially by being freed up to be more productive. Sexually and otherwise. Conversely the female, with her very limited supply of eggs, and the time it takes to rear a child to self-sufficiency, must employ a much more selective, stingy if you will, strategy. Her best odds for successfully passing on her traits are to save herself for the most virile and viable candidates rather than waste her time with just any Tom, Dick, or Harry, thus using her energies to find “the one” and to bear children rather than "squander' it on bread winning etc. So you see, it's in our genetic makeup for the males to be industrious and the females to lean toward domesticity.

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