Skip to main content

What is Choice?

Decisions are not weighed or executed upon a fixed grid of values; rather, they are honed on an ever-focused set of comparable, relative and recognizable Boolean-style bases generated from the operable, recollected, near-replicable sets of perceptible data presented by ever-developing episodes: whether to strike the F key instead of the D key; whether to check one’s Facebook news feed, to respond to an e-mail, to drift into the kitchen for a quick snack, to hydrate, to go for a run, or to stay the course. 

The reader can easily follow the train of thought which has heretofore directed the ever-comparable sets of inductively-relatable options. The controller of this vast grid is always oblivious to a near-infinite array of alternatives which might, under a variety of other circumstances, appear viable and relevant to his position. 

For example, Miguel Cabrera is far less likely to consider the value of the shotgun offense while he approaches the plate at Comerica Park, while game-time Tony Romo is likewise seldom, if ever, focused on scheduling his next dental appointment, navigating the skies in an F-22, or considering inclusively the myriad dynamics which will physically enable a successful ball transference from the hands of his center, Travis Frederick, to his own. The process is simply executed through the near-intuitive exercise of replicated, practiced expectations. 

Of course, those athletes widely considered to be the NFL’s greatest quarterbacks have long been those players who have focused not upon the anatomical physics of their teammates’ hands, their college majors, or the scores of other values complementing their respective lifestyles, but rather upon the coverage and pass-rushing schemes of their opponents. Oftentimes quarterbacks will fumble a snap, lose track of the play clock or game clock as it ticks toward zero, or complete the throwing motion after dropping the ball. This is the consequence of pruning, priming, proactive interference and flow, all of which predispose subjects to circumstances which enable strict and attentive focus on practically and historically useful, reliable translations and processes and upon particularly pressing or enjoyable tasks while ignoring surrounding, imbedded, and non-crucial information. 

This phenomenon is critical to a complete understanding of volition and choice in the market. Whereas onlookers will occasionally cite foolish on-field mistakes, or errors, during any game, the fans will rarely focus on the computational front on the sidelines and in the press boxes or the largely unseen dynamics across the average 134 plays during any game, let alone the greater business of the stadium, the team’s executive office, or the surrounding metropolis. 

Of course, these bystanders have become nearly completely outcome-focused, as they far more intimately understand the object of the game than they comprehend its intricate processes, never hesitating to praise their teams’ respective successes while offering relatively little appreciation for the off-the-screen practices and near-miracles of timed and positioned force regularly producing momentary gaps for the running back to navigate upfield or for the quarterback to scramble away from defenders to allow time for his receiver downfield to create separation and open a throwing lane. 

These lapses in critical and macro awareness, patience, and judgment can create grave consequences, and they often appear upon podiums, grandstands, magazine stands, online publications, less-than-scholarly research, hastily- and sloppily-manufactured theory, and nearly every television station across the globe, even those which purport to be more serious and newsworthy than the rest. 

This is the never-ending episode of polylogistic human behavior. Its layers and dynamics are fascinating to discover and appreciate. They are useful in recognizing our strengths and our shortcomings, as well as our relationships and causes of emotion and disagreement. Becoming aware of these layers is to contribute to an ever-becoming intelligent civilization. Remember, you never truly know the extent of someone’s choice.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Free Money: The Tech Secret Even Silicon Valley Doesn't Know

In July of 2015, Vitalik Buterin officially released the game-changing technology of Ethereum, an immediate competitor to its now-popular and relatively better-known counterpart Bitcoin. A cursory evaluation of the following chart might lead the reader to some wild conclusions, so continue reading to acquire a better understanding of the trajectory of this new-age abstraction of online currency that, despite its massive gains in recent weeks, hasn't remotely become a household name in even Silicon Valley, the tech capital of the world.


A variety of formal and informal polls suggest a lagging familiarity with the increasingly popular cryptocurrency giants. Those who claim awareness are most likely to recognize Bitcoin, while Ethereum has still flown largely undetected in even the heart of Silicon Valley. One might assume with a chart like this, with its major parabolic upswings and indefinite streams of free money, that awareness of the blockchain medium of exchange would have surg…

Hurricane Irma Reveals How Nationalistic America Really Is

It's interesting how the Weather Channel seems to treat the devastation of the Caribbean, even American territories, as precursors to what they have identified as the event, otherwise known as landfall upon the continental United States.

For the people presently facing Irma, the event is happening now.

The reason this is important is that it implies a lot about the way we view the world and its inhabitants.

Although the political map clearly illustrates borders between nations, views from the International Space Station reveal that these boundaries are mere imaginary lines drawn by history's political pundits whose self-interested motives altogether failed to represent the unanimous consensus of the time, and yet they fail even more miserably in that capacity today.


Notwithstanding the fact that we are all inhabitants of this earth, of the same species and familiar family dispositions, we are subliminally inculcated by political representations of this terrestrial world to ass…

Market Manipulation: Mirages in the Desert of Economic Despair

An article published today by MarketWatch, entitled The world is becoming desperate about deflation, reveals the astounding truth that interest rates would not have remained as low as they are today if the American economy had truly recovered from its most recent recession.

Economists of the political ranks tend to support lower interest rates and inflationary measures because they advance spending, boondoggles and measurable economic activity to the limited timeframes of their active administrations, at the real expense of future output and thoughtful investment that simply affords no benefit to present-day headline economic indicators and the intellectuals who wield them.

In an anemic economic climate, infrastructural change is the antidote to misinvestment, while monetary manipulation is the politically-convenient mirage in the desert of economic despair.


While wanderers across that desert perceive advantage in continuing to chase elusive returns and public policy tacitly rewards t…